Pokemon Setting

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Pokemon Setting

Postby whiteprofit » Mon Jun 04, 2012 1:27 pm

The World of Pokemon
Hello there! Welcome to the world of Pokémon! Here you'll find an expanding collection of M+M conversions, suggestions, and guidelines to make a Pokemon setting work with the 2e (and possibly 3e) roleplaying system. Your very own Pokémon legend is about to unfold! A world of dreams and adventures with Pokémon awaits! Let's go!

Our goal here is to have a ready to use setting for anyone to GM a game with the intent to simplify and organize the structure and to better utilize the already existing rules of Mutants and Masterminds and creating as little in way of original or "house rules", as possible. The basics are built so that anyone can use the concepts to create their own versions of any of the current ### pokemon in rotation. They could even make up their own. The builds and recommendations on this thread are designed to keep Pokemon contained and at an appropriate level to battle evenly and remain at a proper scale.

As with any Role Playing Game or Setting, this is a jump off spot. Just because our starting Bulbasaur has Razor Leaf and Poison Powder doesn't mean yours has to. The builds are mostly suggestions and a solution that we found worked well. Feel free to modify, expand, or change anything you need for your setting.
::The following information was collaborated on the boards originally in two locations with many contributing hands. Most was written by Leviathan and whiteprofit, with contributions by Thrincold and others in the original OOC, edited by whiteprofit, and then posted by Manintights in a setting thread. This current thread is a summary of what we came up with and a new setting created by whiteprofit ::

SYSTEM INFORMATION
- Trainer Creation Guidelines
- Pokemon Creation Guidelines
- Type Resistances and Costs
- Drawbacks, Size and Weight
- Base Stats, Senses, and Movement
- Attacks, Secondary Powers, and Flavor Text
- Capturing Pokemon
- Moves, Attacks, and Status Effects
- Equipment
Last edited by whiteprofit on Fri Aug 10, 2012 10:26 am, edited 13 times in total.
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Setting Information

Postby whiteprofit » Mon Jun 04, 2012 1:27 pm

SETTING INFORMATION

Game Settings
The Glaciuary Region
The Pokemon Academy

Towns
- Brook Town (Lab)
- Ruby Pond (Gym)
- Red Falls (Gym) (History Center)
- Gold Creek (Gym) (Mr. E's Mansion)
- Fjord City (Gym) (Department Store)
- Glacier Glades (Gym)
- Black Point (Gym)
- Blue Bay (Gym)
- The Yellow Islands
- White Harbor (Gym)
- Crystal Dunes
- The Arch Isles
- Silver Rapids

Routes
- Route 1
- Route 2
- Route 3
- Route 4
- Route 5

Places
- Green Woods
- Ruby Pond Coal Mines
- The Platinum Mountain Range
- Mr. E's Mansion
- Sapphire Desert
- Pearl Mountain
- The Diamond Cliffs
- Emerald Rain Forest
- Crystal Peaks
- Spiral Ruins

Gym Leaders
- Zeke - Electric - Zap Badge - Ruby Pond
- Alex - Fire - Flame Badge - Red Falls
- Benji- Flying - Wind Badge - Gold Creek
- Henry- Ground - Tunnel Badge - Fjord City
- Alison & Dalton - Doubles Fight - Team Badge - Black Bend
- Jesse - Dark - Shadow Badge - Glacier Glades
- Morgan - Psychic - Cerebrial Badge - Blue Bay
- Shelly - Water - Ocean Badge - White Harbor

Events
- Getting a Starter Pokemon
- 1st Wild Pokemon Encounter
- Hive Five
- Spinda Night in a Shiftry
- Maddy's Taxi Service
- Minor's in the Mine
- Enter Team Rocket
- Minors in the Mine
- The Hauntered Necklace
- Team Rocket Steals the Show
- Stolen Goods
- Abra, Kadabra... Hypno!

People/NPCs
- Professor Aspen
- Mom
- Mister E
- Clankers and Weavers
Last edited by whiteprofit on Sun Dec 30, 2012 10:41 pm, edited 23 times in total.
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Builds and Pokedex

Postby whiteprofit » Mon Jun 04, 2012 1:27 pm

BUILDS
Starter Sheets
- Water and Fire Type Starter
- Trainer A
- Trainer B

NPCs
- Professor Aspen
- Dr. Briar

Rivals
- Rival
- Timothy Thorn

Enemies
- Rex & Miasa

Groups
- The Clankers and the Weavers
Last edited by whiteprofit on Tue Jul 24, 2012 9:28 pm, edited 7 times in total.
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National Pokedex

Postby whiteprofit » Mon Jun 04, 2012 1:28 pm

Last edited by whiteprofit on Fri Aug 10, 2012 10:27 am, edited 3 times in total.
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The Glaciuary Region

Postby whiteprofit » Mon Jun 04, 2012 1:28 pm

The Glaciuary Region
This is a self made region for RPGing with the M+M system.The Glaciuary Region is loosely based on the landscapes of Norway and Finland, though the climate is notably warmer. This is a region in which the major land formations were created by reseeding glaciers and still relies heavily on water industry such as shipping, fishing, and oceanic discovery.

Glaciuary is the combined words "Glacier" and "Estuary".

The Glaciuary Region has eight gyms and an Elite Four, just like the other five regions of the Pokemon Universe. The major difference is that this one is populated by Pokemon from all five generations as per GM and player desire.

History
Glaciuary was created by the recession of large glaciers, carving deep into the rocky land to form cavernouse fjords, deep lakes, high mountains and rough terrain of the northern half. The high rainfall and glacial melt delivers needed nutrients to the lower regions to make them rich with flora and fauna of all kinds. The immense amount of water in the region leaves a culture that is still very much dependent upon the rivers, lakes and ocean surrounding it.

Fishing and Shipping are huge industries here. Elders are incredibly respectful of the ocean and water resources of the area because it provided their lively hood. They've seen the power and beauty in the waterways that younger generations don't always respect.

Cities, Towns, and Land Formations
The naming convention for the majority of the locations in Glaciuary is a combination of colors based on the Game Boy games and water formations. This includes islands, creeks, rivers, and fjords.

The Platinum Mountains make up the majority of the northern part of Glaciuary, dissolving into the Green Woods and the fjords and rivers. The region is longer than it is wide, and spreads South to include islands along the Western Coast, a desert, lakes, and a rain forest.

Given the purpose of Glaciuary, the region includes a vast variety of environments and species in order to explain the existence of nearly 650 Pokemon. It is up to the GM to regulate the suggestions of this thread and help spread out the many duplicate or similar Pokemon to keep the search fun.

Routes
Routes in Glaciuary are numbered, starting at 1. They are based on roads, more than they appear to be in the games. Some, in example route 1, are more walker friendly than later routes that connect to Fjord City and other, larger towns. As in the game, some routes are entirely water, the river being the pavement, and hired ferries or boats the vehicles of choice.

The Routes do number in accordance to the projected travel route of players, but also relate to how North they are. The first route, connecting to Brook Town, is the farthest North, official route in Glaciuary.

Map
[Insert Map Here]
As the region expands, ideas grow, and I begin to draw an actual map, Glaciuary may change greatly. Routes are subject to change as much as the order of cities.

Team Rocket
Though there are some small time crime groups in localized areas, Team Rocket is still the large and in charge group in this thread. The name can be changed to make them a Team Magma or Aqua with some altercations to adjust Pokemon, motivations, and attack styles.

To be continued...
This post is likely to be altered and updated regularly
Last edited by whiteprofit on Tue Jul 24, 2012 5:14 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Trainer Creation Guidelines

Postby whiteprofit » Mon Jun 04, 2012 1:29 pm

Trainer Creation Guidelines
Abilities
Pokemon Trainers come in many different shapes and sizes. A starting trainer is PL 3, unless they have specific training that would raise them above this level. At PL 3, most of their combat stats are maxed out, but their stats may have a few 8s or 9s to make up for one or two above tens.

Beginner Trainers are also usually in the 10 to 13 age bracket, so lower than normal stats aren't unrealistic, and could be a wise gain of points. Usually a 10 in an ability represents an average adult. Children may have a harder time lifting something than an average adult.

Feats (3e Advantages)
Animal Empathy, Assessment, Inspire and Leadership are great feats to take for a battle ready trainer. Anything that allows you to interact in battles with Pokemon. Set-up can transfer the benefits of interaction skills, allowing a trainer to use startle, taunt, or other variations of skills to benefit the attacks of the Pokemon. All from the sidelines.

Skills
Trainers can come with any number of skills to give them different niches, strengths, and characterization. Some characters know about breeding, while others are experts on cooking. A few character skills can always come in handy for play. And don't forget the basics, like Perception, Diplomacy, and the physical skills like Acrobatics, Climbing and Swimming.

It could come in handy for at trainer to have Knowledge (Tactics) for battles. For a trainer with more pokemon knowledge than battle experience, try working points into Knowledge (Pokemon), Notice, and Handle Animal, as well as boosting the INT ability over physical stats.

Powers
There isn't really a need for trainers to have any powers, though some instances may come up.

Shrinking
As 10-14 year olds, their average size may be smaller and a rank or two of this could be appropriate. It also raises some battle stats as well as lowering others, that may be a wanted trade off.

Examples
See Trainer A as an example of a starting trainer that favors battling.
See Trainer B as an example of a starting trainer that favors knowledge and skills.
Last edited by whiteprofit on Tue Jul 24, 2012 9:36 pm, edited 5 times in total.
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Pokemon Creation Guidelines

Postby whiteprofit » Mon Jun 04, 2012 1:30 pm

Pokemon Creation Guidelines

Power Level
It is in my opinion, and some disagree, that PL should start at PL 3 for most starter level pokemon. PL 2 for typically common or weak pokemon such as Caterpie, Rattatta, and other early encountered pokemon. In many of the builds, it was harder to spend points than to reserve them, though there were some exceptions. And remember, this is for a basic, untrained, starter level pokemon.

In my opinion, I think people tend to overpower in M&M and fear they 'cant do anything' with something under 5. But what they forget about Pokemon is: you're barely buying any skills, most stats are lowered (Charisma, Intelligence, and Wisdom), and you get a ton of points from weaknesses and disabilities (no talking, no/limited hands, etc). I regularly had more problems finding places to put points than the other way around.

Also, as a GM, if I want to make a gym leader or boss bad guy that is a level or two higher than the players to give them a bigger challenge, the enemy pokemon just get too high. If the trainer and the pokemon start at 3, a level 4-7 enemy are all viable levels for challenges. If everyone starts at 5, almost everything has to be level 6 or 7, otherwise I get into legendary level ranges.

Lastly, the show depicts lower evolutions beating higher ones all the time, using strategy and teamwork. This is easier to accomplish with the condensed power ranges.

Obviously for every rule there are exceptions. That is the way of it and those bridges will be crossed upon arrival (legendaries, unevolving, special or rares, etc).

Abilities
Standard Pokemon abilities such as strength and intelligence should be lower than that of a human. Not so low as to warrant a wild animal, as many Pokemon often depict a good understanding of what is going on around them, and trained Pokemon even more. This is both a good place to free up some points in a buil as well as a realistic place to show a Pokemon's character.

Skills
The following skills are very appropriate for wild Pikemon: acrobatics (+2-6), climbing (+2-6), Escape Artist (+2-6), Survival (5+), Stealth (+4-8) (most done already with shrinking) Swimming (+0-6), Notice (+2-8), Sense Motive (+2-8), Search (+0-8),

Feats (3e Advantages)
Animal Empathy should almost come standard, unless a Pokemon is an outcast or otherwise uncarring creature. As apposed to putting points into handle animal, Pokemon communicate with one another through diplomacy rather than knowing how to provide care. Though this feat is almost an assumed ability considering the setting.

Attractive in this setting works more based on a "cuteness factor" rather than a sexy or attractedness way. A Pokemon that is stunning to behold, perhaps a legendary, may have a feat that acts much like attractive though under a different name like "awe inspiring".

To be continued...
Last edited by whiteprofit on Fri Jul 06, 2012 10:56 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Pokemon Types and Resitances

Postby whiteprofit » Mon Jun 04, 2012 1:32 pm

Type Resistances and Costs
These are taken from the M&M Ultimate Power book and cross referencing with Bulbapedia.
:idea: Though displayed under the Power Level, a pokemon's type resistances are purchased in the powers section using Half-Immunity (2pp each). Vulnerabilities are worth 2pp each. And full immunities to an attack type costs 5 points each.
Single Pokemon Types
Normal Type: Cost 3 points (Vulnerability: Fighting. Immunity: Ghost)
Fire Type: Cost 4 points (Vulnerability: Ground, Rock, Water. Resist: Bug, Fire, Grass, Ice, Steel)
Water Type: Cost 4 points (Vulnerability: Electric, Grass. Resist: Fire, Ice, Steel, Water)
Grass Type: Grants 2 points (Vulnerability: Bug, Fire, Flying, Ice, Poison. Resist: Electric, Grass, Ground, Water)
Electric Type: Cost 4 points (Vulnerability: Ground. Resist: Electric, Flying, Steel)
Psychic Type: Grants 2 points (Vulnerability: Bug, Dark, Ghost. Resist: Fighting, Psychic)
Ice Type: Grants 6 points (Vulnerability: Fighting, Fire, Rock, Steel. Resist: Ice)
Steel Type: Cost 21 points (Vulnerability: Fighting, Fire, Ground. Resist: Bug, Dark, Dragon, Flying, Ghost, Grass, Ice, Normal, Psychic, Rock, Steel. Immunity: Poison)
Dragon Type: Cost 4 points (Vulnerability: Dragon, Ice. Resist: Electric, Fire, Grass, Water)
Dark Type: Cost 5 points (Vulnerability: Bug, Fighting. Resist: Dark, Ghost. Immunity: Psychic)
Fighting Type: Cost 2 points (Vulnerability: Flying, Psychic. Resist: Bug, Dark, Rock)
Flying Type: Cost 5 points (Vulnerability: Electric, Ice, Rock. Resist: Bug, Fighting, Grass. Immunity: Ground)
Poison Type: Cost 4 points (Vulnerability: Ground, Psychic. Resist: Bug, Fighting, Poison, Grass)
Ground Type: Cost 3 points (Vulnerability: Ice, Grass, Water. Resist: Poison, Rock. Immunity: Electric)
Rock Type: Grants 2 points (Vulnerability: Fighting, Grass, Ground, Steel, Water. Resist: Normal, Fire, Flying, Poison)
Bug Type: No Cost (Vulnerability: Fire, Flying, Rock. Resist: Fighting, Grass, Ground)
Ghost Type: Cost 10 points (Vulnerability: Dark, Ghost. Resist: Bug, Poison. Immunity: Fighting, Normal)
Common Combos:
Grass/Poison Type: No Cost (Vulnerability: Fire, Flying, Ice, Psychic. Resist: Fighting, Grass, Electric, Water)
Ghost/Poison Type: Cost 8 points (Vulnerability: Ground, Psychic, Dark, Ghost. Resist: Bug, Grass, Poison. Immunity: Fighting, Normal)
Normal/Flying Type: Cost 8 points (Vulnerability: Rock, Electric, Ice. Resist: Bug, Grass. Immunity: Ground, Ghost)
Rock/Water Type: Cost 2 points (Vulnerability: Fighting, Ground, Grass, Electric. Resist: Normal, Flying, Poison, Fire, Ice.)
Water/Ground Type: Cost 11 points (Vulnerability: Grass. Resist: Poison, Rock, Steel, Fire. Immunity: Electric)
Water/Flying Type: Cost 11 points (Vulnerability: Rock, Electric. Resist: Fighting, Bug, Steel, Water, Fire. Immunity: Ground)
Bug/Flying Type: Cost 1 points (Vulnerability: Fire, Electric, Rock, Flying, Ice. Resist: Fighting, Bug, Grass. Immunity: Ground)
Bug/Poison Type: No Cost (Vulnerability: Flying, Rock, Fire, Psychic. Resist: Fighting, Poision, Bug, Grass)
Poison/Flying Type: Cost 5 Points (Vulnerable: Electric, Rock, Ice, Psychic; Resist: Grass, Poison, Fighting, Bug; Immunity: Ground)
Rock/Ground Type: Cost 3 Points (Vulnerability: Fighting, Ground, Steel, Water, Grass, Ice. Resist: Normal, Flying, Poison, Rock, Fire. Immunity: Electric)
Steel/Ground Type: Cost 20 points (Vulnerability: Fighting, Fire, Ground, Water. Resist: Bug, Dark, Dragon, Flying, Ghost, Normal, Psychic, Rock, Steel. Immunity: Poison, Electric)
Steel/Dark Type: Cost 24 points (Vulnerability: Fighting, Ground, Fire; Resist: Bug, Normal, Flying, Rock, Ghost, Steel, Grass, Ice, Dragon, Dark; Immunity: Poison, Psychic)
Steel/Electric Type: Cost 23 points (Vulnerability: Fighting, Fire, Ground. Resist: Bug, Dark, Dragon, Flying, Ghost, Grass, Ice, Normal, Psychic, Rock, Steel, Electric. Immunity: Poison)
Steel/Flying Type: Cost 26 points (Vulnerability: Fire, Electric; Resist: Normal, Flying, Bug, Ghost, Steel, Grass, Psychic, Dragon, Dark; Immunity: Poison, Ground)
Fire/Flying Type: Cost 9 points (Vulnerable: Electric, Rock, Water; Resist: Bug, Fire, grass, Steel, Fighting; Immunity: Ground)
Last edited by whiteprofit on Sat Jun 30, 2012 5:12 pm, edited 5 times in total.
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Drawbacks, Size and Weight

Postby whiteprofit » Mon Jun 04, 2012 1:38 pm

Pokemon Drawbacks 2e
Limited Speech: 2-4 points (all Pokemon should have this, barring odd occurrences like Meowth). I built many original builds at 4 points, but have recently started thinking that a 2 is more accurate because emotion, alarm, and minimal communication is still possible with limited speech. It's not the same as being mute.)
No hands: 4 points (most Pokemon are likely to have this of some form)
Rudimentary Hands: 2 points. Some Pokemon have small appendages that are capable of some degree of manipulation.


Pokemon Complications 3e
3e eliminated drawbacks as they appear in 2e. In one version I've seen played, players still used the set up and rules the same from 2e and followed the examples above. I've tried not to, simply to honor the new system. The complications of Limited Speech and No Hands/Rudimentary hands are viable complications to meet the minimum of two and work the same as above, but giving the trainer a HP when they are set back by them, rather than getting points to spend because of the common occurance.

i have a feeling they were eliminated because people didn't use them properly and too liberally, and requiring complications makes for better and more interesting characters as well as stops point hoarding for things that don't really effect game play. (Example: Professor Exavier's immobility rarely effected his abiltiy to be useful, function, or even participate. And when it did, he should get a hero point in the moment, rather than points he already spent on something else)

Similarly, Pokemon rarely are hindered by their ability to only say one word. They can still convey feelings, emotions, and limited warnings. In the event that their screams pull someone into a trap or cause confusion rather than help, that is a time when a hero point should be administered.
Under the Hood: this does create some minor hiccups when designing Pokemon Types. I've been building them the same as 2e, outlined as in this thread. Most of the time types still cost SOMETHING even if only 1 or 2 points. In rare cases, it is possible to have a type actually give the build some points. Technically this isn't allowed but I don't see a way around it yet.


Pokemon Size 2e
Using the scale listed below (Originally from the M+M text), and the Bulbapedia resource, find out how large or small your pokemon is. Then apply appropriate numbers of Shrinking or Growth to the base character sheet.

Shrinking and Growth should have the following additions: Permanent, Innate, and Full Power.
Shrinking, with these modifications, costs 1pp/rank.
Growth, with these modifications, costs 3pp/rank.
Under the Hood: This combination of feats, drawbacks, and flaws means the pokemon always has those characteristics, can't change them, and no one can 'nullify' or turn them off. Powers that allow the pokemon to change size, or abilities that characterize a pokemon to change size may add or lose some of those on a case by case basis (Ex. the power Minimize)


Pokemon Size 3e
The major differences in 3e with size are the costs. With Innate and Full Power applied as the only options, the cost of both powers is 2pp per rank. This gets pretty expensive and most Pokemon I stat are just shrunk to small size rather than Tiny. The costs for these stages are expressed second in the table.

Size Chart
Gargantuan: 32-63ft. Apply twelve ranks of Growth (Permanent, Innate). 36 points/25pp
Huge: 16-31ft. Apply eight ranks of Growth (Permanent, Innate). 24 points/17pp
Large: 8-15ft. Apply four ranks of Growth (Permanent, Innate). 12 points/9pp
Medium: 4-8ft. M&M Default
**Small: 2-4ft. Apply four ranks of Shrinking (Permanent, Innate). 4 points**/9pp
Tiny: 1-2ft. Apply eight ranks of Shrinking (Permanent, Innate). 8 points/17pp
Diminutive: 6'-1ft. Apply twelve ranks of Shrinking (Permanent, Innate). 12 points/25pp
Fine: 3-6'. Apply sisteen ranks of Shrinking (Permanent, Innate). 16 points/33pp (yes, there is a Pokemon this small)

**Most commonly used size constraint, especially for starters

Pokemon Weight
Even the biggest Pokemon is only a couple of thousand pounds. This means that any Pokemon above Large is automatically lighter than the height/weight chart indicates it should be. This will be ignored mostly in the game.
Last edited by whiteprofit on Tue Aug 14, 2012 11:33 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Base Stats, Senses, and Movement

Postby whiteprofit » Mon Jun 04, 2012 3:36 pm

Base Stats
On the Bulbapedia page if you scroll down there is a "Base stats" option that can help with determining how close to caps your Pokemon should be in various attack styles, how high its defense should be, and how fast it should be.
Due to how subjective the stats are (depending on evolution level and how powerful the pokemon is) a hard-and-fast rule would require way too much math and cause some Pokemon to be just plain weaker than others, but it should provide a good place to start.
Since some Pokemon have sucky stats across the board, just compare it's stats relative to its other stats.
eg, take Houndour (http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Houndour#Stats)
Its Attack and speed are significantly higher than it's defenses so I'll be spending my points on a spread something like this: Dex & reflex save high. Fort & Con moderate. Toughness mid-low. Defense mid. Attack high.

You don't need to try and combat cap all your Pokemon. They do have their own strengths and weaknesses, don't be afraid to model them.

Senses
An easy one to forget or underestimate, just keep an eye on it. A GM may require the purchase of the Innate power for Senses linked to these powers based on physiology.
1) Check the Bulbapedia entry and see if they call out a particular sense as being special (like Ralt's emotion sense)
2) See if the creature it's based on would probably have something beyond a normal human (eg a dog based Pokemon will probably have Scent and maybe better hearing, while a bird based one probably has extended vision).
3) Do they have a power that may cause a sense? eg en Electric Pokemon may well have a detect electricity sense
4) If none of those come up, probably safe to just assume standard senses.

Movement
Speed, Flight, Burrowing, & Swimming
Under the Hood: A concern when using M+M for ranking speed on characters is that the ranks stack very quickly. Rank 1 of the speed power allows medium sized characters a move action speed of 10/mph. Using full-out movement, that is a speed of 40 mph. Rapidash, notably one of the fastest pokemon maxes out at rank 3, 150 mph.

Bycicles and most pokemon should not exceed a speed rank of 1, w/o good cause.
Flight with a flaw: "half speed" is wisely considered for most flying pokemon w/o good cause.
Burrowing and Swimming should not far exceed ranks 1 or 2 w/o good cause.
Improved Initiative can be used to indicate a higher speed for pokemon. Having a higher Dexterity score to show their fast reflexes also works.
Applications of Leaping should be carefully considered, also.
Note: Leaping Rank 1 on a Str 10 character is a jump distance of 20ft.
Quickness, as a movement application, should not be used when designing your pokemon, w/o good cause.
Super-Movement powers like slithering, wall-crawling, or water-walking should be considered for special powers of pokemon where applicable.
Last edited by whiteprofit on Wed Jun 13, 2012 10:49 am, edited 3 times in total.
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Attacks, Secondary Powers, and Flavor Text

Postby whiteprofit » Mon Jun 04, 2012 3:36 pm

Attacks
Another basic but easy to overlook. Make sure that Bulbapedia actually says that your pokemon can learn the moves you're trying to give it. Most of the time it's the difference of a descriptor in M+M. Dealing damage is dealing damage. The descriptor determines if it's super-effective or not, physical or energy, and will play into effects and immunities.

And don't forget the use of an unarmed attack. Using it could provide some added strategy in battles. Tackle is essentially an unarmed attack. Instead of paying for Strike 3, it may be cheaper to boost the unarmed attack as it is.

Secondary Powers and Flavor Text
Consider Environmental Adaptation, Favored Environment, and low level immunity or half-effect immunity's based on the flavor text and secondary abilities of your Pokemon. (Find these listed on Bulbapedia)
Example: A water Pokemon, capable of swimming below the surface of the water should include things like: Immunity (Suffocation (Drowning)) and Environmental Adaptation: Underwater.
Example: Some Pokemon are called out as living in Lava, Rocky Mountains, or in extremely hot/cold environments. Heat/Cold immunity's and Adaptations are appropriate here.
Example: High Flying Pokemon might have Environmental Adaptation: High Altitudes
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Re: Capturing Pokemon

Postby whiteprofit » Tue Jun 05, 2012 3:24 pm

Capturing Pokemon
Pokeballs are equipment, purchased with EP, using the Snare Power. The following is a sample build:
Pokeball 10ep - Snare Rank 3 (Feats: Reversible; Extras: Engulf, Range, Regenerating, Alternate Save (Toughness); Flaws: Limited (Wild Pokemon Only)) (Cost 3pp/rank)

What this means is, the player must make a ranged attack roll to hit with the thrown item. On a successful hit, the target must make a toughness save against the Snare rank. On a failed save, the target is bound and helpless or "captured". And the target must be a pokemon and wild.

The target can try to get out using their strength modifier or will save*, whichever is higher. Each round is a separate attempt to escape with the regeneration extra as the damage is erased at the end of each round. The engulfing extra eliminates the 'entangled' failure, meansthe creature is inside the object, and if the ball receives damage from the outside, it can lose it's ability to hold the captured pokemon.
*House Rule

Pokeballs can be reused, but must be retrieved. Buying additional pokeballs (must be of the same type), can be purchased for 1ep more each. So a collection of 5 would cost 14ep.

Pokeballs can be purchased, earned, or given without the cost of ep as per the story or in game event. That means they aren't paid for, but also can be lost, stolen, or taken away. They are not a 'part' of the character.

See the equipment section for more information about alternative types of pokeballs.

An Explanation
The reasons we chose to use the Snare function are:
:arrow: it is well defined and already exists in the game, allowing disputes to be settled by the books.
:arrow: It allows the pokemon to escape at any time and the trainer can release them at any time, per the existing rules on Snare.
:arrow: A pokemon can return to the pokeball by not fighting the snare, accepting the result. In the show there are times when pokemon refuse to go back into the ball, and this is built into snare already.
Last edited by whiteprofit on Tue Jun 05, 2012 10:45 pm, edited 4 times in total.
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Re: Starter Sheets

Postby whiteprofit » Tue Jun 05, 2012 9:48 pm

Not sure where to start? Here are two common type build sheets to get you started. Be creative and look for things to make your pokemon stand out.

Some notes:

:arrow: Though displayed under the Power Level, a pokemon's type resistances are purchased in the powers section using Half-Immunity (2pp each). Vulnerabilities are worth 2pp each. And full immunities to an attack type costs 5 points each.
:arrow: Per GM request, please separate attacks from other powers by a space, and fill out the attack section within a quote box as seen below.
:arrow: Filling in the image URL where you see "[Picture%20Here]" will post a picture of your pokemon. A great resource is Bulbapedia.
:!: If using Hero Lab, and creating a "no cost" type pokemon or one with a point gain, be aware that the immunity costs a minimum of 1 power point. You can get around this by including a Custom drawback: "pay off immunity cost" and then edit it when posting or by including the vulnerabilities in the drawback section instead of on the immunity power itself.


Water Type Starter Sheet
[img][Picture%20Here][/img]

Power Level: 3; Power Points Spent: -12/45
Water Type [4pp]
Not Very Effective: Fire, Ice, Steel, Water; Super Effective: Grass, Electric

STR: -2 (6), DEX: +0 (10), CON: +0 (10), INT: -3 (4), WIS: -2 (6), CHA: -2 (6)

Tough: +0, Fort: +0, Ref: +0, Will: -2
Attack Bonus: +1 (Ranged: +1, Melee: +1, Grapple: -6)
Defense: +0 (Flat-footed: +0), Knockback: +1
Initiative: +0

Powers:
Body Type (Shrinking 4) (-4 STR, -1 size category, -5 ft. movement; Permanent; Innate; Full Power)
Swimming 2 (Speed: 5 mph, 44 ft./rnd)
Attacks:
Unarmed Attack, +1 (DC 13)

Drawbacks: Disability (Limited Speech, No Hands)

Totals: Abilities -14 + Skills 0 (0 ranks) + Feats 0 + Powers 10 + Combat 0 + Saves 0 - Drawbacks 8 = -12

:arrow: This Water Type starter is at the very basics. No attacks, extras, or real definition.
:!: As you can see, before adding too many powers or anything specific, a typical water build starts with an extra 12pp because of drawbacks and lowered stats.
:idea: Use this template as an example to start any type, filling in the type cost from the type resistance and cost page

Fire Type Starter
[img][Picture%20Here][/img]

Power Level: 3; Power Points Spent: 42/45
Fire: Cost 4 points
(Vulnerability: Ground, Rock, Water. Resist: Bug, Fire, Grass, Ice, Steel)

STR: -2 (6), DEX: +0 (10), CON: +0 (10), INT: -3 (4), WIS: -2 (6), CHA: -2 (6)

Tough: +0/+2, Fort: +5, Ref: +5, Will: +5
Attack Bonus: +3 (Ranged: +3, Melee: +3, Grapple: -4)
Defense: +4 (Flat-footed: +2), Size: Small, Knockback: +0
Initiative: +0

Skills: Notice 6 (+4), Sense Motive 6 (+4), Survival 6 (+4)

Feats: Animal Empathy, Defensive Roll 2, Dodge Focus

Powers:
Ember (Linked)
. . , Blast 3 (Linked; DC 18)
. . . Stun 1 (Linked; DC 11; Range (ranged))
. . Scratch (Strike 3) (Alternate; DC 18)

Leer (Nauseate 3) (DC 13; Range 2 (perception); Sicken)
. . Growl (Stun 3) (Alternate; DC 13; Range (ranged); Daze)

Height (Shrinking 4) (-4 STR, -1 size category, -5 ft. movement; Permanent; Innate; Full Power)
Super-Senses 2 (low-light vision, scent)

Attacks:
Ember: Blast 3, +3 (DC 18), Stun 1, +3 (DC Fort/Staged 11)
Growl (Stun 3), +3 (DC Fort/Staged 13),
Leer (Nauseate 3) (DC Fort/Staged 13),
Scratch (Strike 3), +3 (DC 18)
Unarmed Attack, +3 (DC 13)
Drawbacks: Disability, common, major, Limited Speech, Disability, common, major, No Hands

Totals: Abilities -14 + Skills 5 (18 ranks) + Feats 4 + Powers 30 + Combat 8 + Saves 17 - Drawbacks 8 = 42

:arrow: Notice the first examples of attacks. Ember is linked to Stun, to create damage effect with a possible burn outcome.
:arrow: In this build we included a few skills such as survival, sense motive, and notice. We also included Animal Empathy. All four things might be common for wild pokemon, given their animal instincts to survive in nature.
:idea: Using Nauseate, limited to sicken, and Stun, limited to Daze, we have created negative modifying attacks that don't use Drain.
:?: How will you use the the remaining 3 points to define this pokemon? You could add a tail, some feats, or increase several skills. Alter or add an attack/move.
Last edited by whiteprofit on Sun Jan 12, 2014 3:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Family of Supers -Kit Andersen/ GravityBoy!

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Trainer A

Postby whiteprofit » Tue Jun 05, 2012 10:14 pm

Trainer A
Image
Power Level: 3; Power Points Spent: 45/45

STR: -1 (9), DEX: +0 (10), CON: +0 (10), INT: +1 (12), WIS: +0 (11), CHA: +0 (10)

Tough: +0/+3, Fort: +3, Ref: +4, Will: +4
Attack Bonus: +2 (Ranged: +3, Melee: +2, Grapple: +1)
Defense: +3 (Flat-footed: +1), Knockback: -1
Initiative: +0

Skills: Acrobatics 4 (+4), Diplomacy 3 (+3), Handle Animal 4 (+4), Knowledge (Pokemon) 4 (+5), Knowledge (tactics) 4 (+5), Medicine 1 (+1), Notice 4 (+4), Sense Motive 4 (+4), Survival 4 (+4), Swim 4 (+3)

Feats: Animal Empathy, Assessment, Attack Focus (ranged), Defensive Roll 3, Dodge Focus, Equipment 3, Inspire 2 (+2), Leadership, Luck

Equipment:
Pokeball x5 [Snare 3, DC 13; Alternate Save (Toughness), Engulf, Regenerating; Reversible; Custom (Limited (Wild Pokemon))]
PokeGear (Smart Phone 2ep)
Travel Gear (Tent, Sleeping Gear, Cooking Tools 3ep)
Attacks: Snare 3, +2 (DC Staged/Tou ), Unarmed Attack, +2 (DC 14)

Totals: Abilities 2 + Skills 9 (36 ranks) + Feats 15 + Powers 0 + Combat 8 + Saves 11 + Drawbacks 0 = 45
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Re: Pokemon Setting

Postby whiteprofit » Tue Jun 05, 2012 10:41 pm

Trainer B
Image
Power Level: 3; Power Points Spent: 45/45

STR: -1 (8), DEX: +0 (10), CON: -1 (8), INT: +2 (14), WIS: +1 (12), CHA: +1 (12)

Tough: -1/+1, Fort: +2, Ref: +3, Will: +5
Attack Bonus: +1 (Ranged: +1, Melee: +1, Grapple: +0)
Defense: +2 (Flat-footed: +1), Knockback: +0
Initiative: +0

Skills: Concentration 2 (+3), Diplomacy 4 (+5), Gather Information 4 (+5), Handle Animal 6 (+7), Knowledge (Pokemon) 8 (+10), Medicine 4 (+5), Notice 4 (+5), Sense Motive 4 (+5), Survival 4 (+5)

Feats: Animal Empathy, Assessment, Defensive Roll 2, Equipment 6, Inspire 3 (+3), Master Plan, Well-Informed

Equipment:
Great Ball [Snare 5, DC 15; Engulf, Range (perception), Regenerating; Limited ((Wild Pokemon)); Reversible],
Pokeball [Snare 3, DC 13; Engulf, Range (perception), Regenerating; Limited (Wild Pokemon); Reversible],
PokeGear (Smart phone 2ep)
Sleeping Gear (1ep)
MedKit (1ep)

Attacks:
Snare 3, +1 (DC Ref/Staged 13),
Snare 5, +1 (DC Ref/Staged 15),
Unarmed Attack, +1 (DC 14)

Totals: Abilities 4 + Skills 10 (40 ranks) + Feats 15 + Powers 0 + Combat 6 + Saves 10 + Drawbacks 0 = 45
Family of Supers -Kit Andersen/ GravityBoy!


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